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Top 10 Bravest Communities in the World

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10. African Warrior Tribes

For defence and expansion, the ancient African kingdoms relied heavily on their troops and military. Because of their superior military, many larger kingdoms were feared by lesser kingdoms and were able to maintain their supremacy for generations. The Somali people are without a doubt the most powerful African group that has ever existed. They occupy Africa’s largest territory, which are spread across four countries: Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Djibouti. They are fierce ranchers and skilled traders with Africa’s richest maritime culture and history. The Nubian People are recognised for creating the Kush Kingdom, Africa’s longest-running monarchy. From the Middle East to Europe, the Kush Kingdom successfully repelled all foreign invaders and conquered and dominated the Egyptian Empire. Another unrated Mali people are famed for constructing the most powerful Empire in West Africa, which they were able to colonise because of their tremendous military capacity.

9. Israeli

In the face of tremendous everyday obstacles, Israelis recognise that each day is a blessing and that life must be lived one day at a time. They achieved their independence and right to exist against huge obstacles, and they’ve never enjoyed a long period of rest and enjoyment where they didn’t have to worry about fighting for their lives all over again. The majority of Israelis understand why they are fighting. For some, it is a religious and spiritual understanding of the significance of Israel’s land to the Jewish people’s very existence and soul. Others are driven by a passionate commitment to ensure that the Holocaust never happens again by providing a safe haven for every Jew.

8. Japanese

The samurai (or bushi) were pre modern Japan’s warriors. The Samurai were a hereditary officer caste and military aristocracy in mediaeval and early modern Japan from the 12th century through 1876. They were the daimyo’s really well-paid retainers (the great feudal landholders). They enjoyed high status and unusual rights, such as the ability to wield two swords. They practised the bushido martial virtues of indifference to suffering and unwavering allegiance, participating in several local fights. Against the invading Mongols in the 13th century, the samurai proved to be skilled fighters. They were the stewards and chamberlains of the daimyo estates during the calm Edo era (1603 to 1868), obtaining managerial expertise and education.

7. Marathas

The Marathas ruled from the Arabian Sea to the Bay of Bengal. The Maratha Empire was founded on the ruins of the Mughal Empire. The Mughal Emperor had become a vassal of the Marathas. The Mughal Empire relied on the Marathas for defence. Once upon a time, in the realm of the Marathas, there reigned a fearless young ruler known as Shivaji. He was recognised for his bravery as well as his successful combat techniques. This young man went on to become Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj, which in history is remembered as one of India’s most powerful kings and a thorn in the side of the Mughal Empire. Under the leadership of Shivaji Maharaj, who revolted against the Adil Shahi dynasty and built out a state with Raigad as its capital in the 17th century, the Marathas rose to prominence.

6. Vikings

Vikings are often depicted as one-dimensional warriors whose accomplishments are restricted to pillage and raiding. Vikings were formidable fighters. They lived in a brutal era where warrior culture was idealised. All male Vikings were required to complete weapons training in order to protect their settlements during raids. The Vikings also had a large network, allowing them to strike just when treasuries and granaries were ready to be robbed – and with minimal resistance.

5. Mongols

How did a force of 100,000 poorly armored soldiers equipped with bows and arrows destroy practically every other army? The Mongols’ foes outnumbered them by the hundreds or thousands in most cases. So, how could the Mongol army keep winning in the face of such adversity? The Mongol army’s brutal edge against the slower, heavier armies of the period was due to a mix of training, tactics, discipline, intellect, and the continual adaptation of new tactics.
Mongols learned to ride and hunt as soon as they were old enough to grasp a bow. Mongol weapons horses and humans were robust, fast, and durable, with a long lifespan.

4. Cossacks

The COSSACKS are a brand of Russian military combatants who still exist today, but not with the same military might as before. The term “Cossack” comes from the Turkic kazak, which means “free man” or “adventurer.” They’re also famed for their military prowess, particularly in terms of horsemanship. In the year 1395, the phrase was first used.  The most popular Cossacks are the Ukrainian Zaporizhia Cossacks and the Russian Don, Kuban, and Ural Cossacks. The Cossacks participated in a succession of rebellions in the 17th and 18th centuries in order to maintain their independence, including the Pugachev insurrection of 1773-1775, which inspired Alexander Pushkin’s popular  “The Captain’s Daughter.” They also played a significant role in the Russian Czars’ expansion of land.

3. Kurds

Kurd is a language and ethnic group that lives in the Taurus Mountains of southeastern Anatolia, the Zagros Mountains of western Iran, parts of northeastern Syria,  northern Iraq, and western Armenia, as well as other nearby places. Numerous genocides and rebellions have occurred in recent Kurdish history, as well as current armed confrontations in Turkish, Iranian, Syrian, and Iraqi Kurdistan. Kurdish autonomous territories exist in Iraq and Syria, and Kurdish movements continue to push for more cultural rights, autonomy, and independence throughout Kurdistan.

2. Gurkhas

The fabled Gurkhas have spawned a plethora of works describing their character, quality, and accomplishments while under British command. The Gurkhas have served in various wars, including both world wars and the Falkland Islands War. During World War I, the Gurkhas lost 20,000 men and received over 2,000 medals for bravery. The Gurkhas have astonished (and horrified) everyone around them since they are known as some of the world’s most skilled and fierce fighters. The Gurkhas have earned a terrifying reputation throughout the last two centuries, as evidenced by their motto, “it is better to die than to be a coward.” Gurkha warriors have produced some of the bravest soldiers and stories in history.

1. Sikhs

The Sikh community is the bravest, and they are known for their self-respect as well as their humanitarian endeavours that have a beneficial impact on the globe. This is something that should be remembered. Sikhs have always been a community that has stood for the highest levels of honour and valour. Believe it or not, the world is replete with examples of this Rab de bandey going above and beyond their means to be the best that humanity has to offer, reminding us all that kindness, courage, and empathy are still alive and well. There are so many anecdotes that make us wonder if they have a golden heart, such as when young Sikh volunteers organised the long 24-hour langar for those trapped during the tough Jat agitations, or when young Sikh volunteers organised a day langar for those stranded during the Jat agitations, After the  bruta; November terror attacks, the real hearts Sikh community of Paris rallied to help the beleaguered Parisians, and Khalsa and also when sikhs set up a ‘Langar’ in IS territory to feed refugees at the Iraq-Syria border.

15 thoughts on “Top 10 Bravest Communities in the World”

  1. “𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓡𝓲𝓼𝓼𝓪𝓵𝓪”
    “If you want to live an authentic, meaningful life, you need to master the art of disappointing and upsetting others, hurting feelings, and living with the reality that some people just won’t like you. It may not be easy, but it’s essential if you want your life to reflect your deepest desires, values, and needs.”

    “𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓡𝓲𝓼𝓼𝓪𝓵𝓪”
    We soldiers-who r rewarded. For killing, also find it difficult to kill in cold blood, especially in close combat. Looking other person in the eye, with a full awareness of his humanity, and then pulling the trigger and blowing them away is an intense traumatic experience leave aside cutting the throat open and feel the gush of warm blood. I have trained young local & foreign soldiers for close combat in over 10 countries. The immense destructive power lies in the fact that convincing excludes victims from the universe of moral obligation. So killing them is of no greater consequence than swatting a mosquito or poisoning a rat. that is what i need to convince them . Young soldiers sometimes vomit, weep become incontinent, or tremble uncontrollably after their first kill. It’s clear that human beings have a horror of killing as well as a fatal attraction to it. Our inhibitions keep the violent side in check, but when the balance between them is upset, the results can be devastating. I get random calls even after 20 yrs now seeking solace and support.
    KILLING IS EASY – ITS THE LIVING WITH IT FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE THATS THE DIFFICULT PART.!!!

    “𝓣𝓱𝓮 𝓡𝓲𝓼𝓼𝓪𝓵𝓪”

  2. Sikhs never attack women and children, unarmed enemy and fallen adversary. They provide succour to the wounded both own and that of the enemy. They are unmatched in the field of courage and humanity. That is why they are called saint soldiers. P

  3. Proud to be a Sikh. I knew we , our ancestors a brave nation but never knew we are Bravest. Sir please nte we are very kind too. You will find us wherever the humanity is suffering.
    Colonel Sajjan Singh

  4. All communities are brave. The situation dictates. The Tamils ruled from Arabian sea to South China sea, Srilanka to Kalinga. The LTTE fought two mighty armies.

  5. Sikh community is at number ONE and will remain at number ONE. This is all with the blessings of all the ten gurus.

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